Tag Archives: installation

FRITZ!Box tuning part 4: Cross-building and installing additional applications

The articles I wrote about the FRITZ!Box are pretty popular. They are creating the most traffic on my website. I understand this, cause the FRITZ!Box is a really great piece of hardware and AVM is also a company which knows how to make their users happy by serving regular updates to the firmware. Although I didn’t tuned my FRITZ!Box any further, I updated it with the latest Labor firmware version regularly. At some point the sshd setupĀ (with dropbear) doesn’t worked anymore and I decided it is the time to update my software as well. Beside that it didn’t work anymore it is always a good idea to update software which allow access to a host from everywhere very regularly. Anyway, it turned out this isn’t as simple as I initial thought. Therefore here is the next post in the FRITZ!Box tuning series, which shows how to cross-build software for the MIPS32 architecture used in the FRITZ!Box and in particular get the sshd software to life again. I use a FRITZ!Box Fon WLAN 7270 v2 and the firmware is 54.05.05. Please make sure you read the other FRITZ!Box articles as well, cause some of the information given there still applies.

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Kernel driver code signing with the VeriSign Class 3 Primary CA – G5 certificate

Since the first 64-bit version of Windows Vista it is necessary to digital sign any kernel mode driver. Without a proper code signing the driver isn’t loaded by the system. Although it is also possible to sign drivers and applications for the 32-bit versions of Windows (as far as I know starting with Windows XP) it became mandatory in the 64-bit versions for any kernel mode driver. A serious software provider always sign its own software to make sure the user can rely on the authenticity of the package he e.g. downloaded from the Internet. It also prevent a question about installing a driver from an untrusted source which could be denied by the user and therefore makes the own software unusable. In any case the user has to confirm an installation of a driver, even if this driver is correctly signed, if the driver isn’t Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL) certificated. In the following post I will not explain the basics of how to sign Windows drivers, there are many articles out there like the one from Microsoft itself, but I will look at changes which have to be made to correctly code sign drivers with a certificate signed by the VeriSign Class 3 Primary CA – G5 root certificate, which is in use by the end of 2010.

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Creating file shortcuts on three different operation systems

As you may know, developing for multiple platforms is one of my strengths. Strictly speaking, it’s a basic requirement if you are involved in such a product like VirtualBox, which runs on every major (and several minor) platform available today. Beside the GUI, which uses Qt and therewith is portable without any additional cost (which isn’t fully true if you want real native look and feel on every platform, especially on Mac OS X), all the rest of VirtualBox is written in a portable way. This is done by using only C/C++ and Assembler when necessary. Everything which needs a different approach, because of the design of the OS (and the API’s which are available there), is implemented in a platform dependent way. In the history of VirtualBox, several modules are created and grown by the time, which makes it really easy to deal with this differences. For stuff like file handling, paths, strings, semaphores or any other basic functionality, you can just use the modules which are available. On the other side it might be necessary, for a new feature we implement, to write it from the ground. In the following post I will show how to create a file shortcut for the three major operation systems available today.

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Understanding some of the mysteries of launchd

Have you ever wondered how Mac OS X knows which file type belongs to which application? On Windows there is the registry. An installer writes the necessary info into it. Most applications on Mac OS X doesn’t come with an installer, they are just moved from the downloaded DMG file to the /Applications folder. So a developer doesn’t have the ability to take action when the user “install” the application. Anyway there is no need to provide an installer for just this task, cause Mac OS X register file type associations on the first start of the application. In the following post, I will show how to do this, but furthermore I will show where this information is stored and how it could be reseted.

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Installing Linux on a USB hard disk for the MacBook Pro

One of the features of Mac OS X I love, is the possibility to install Mac OS X on any attached removable media, like a FireWire or USB hard disk. This makes it really easy for me to test VirtualBox on the several versions of Mac OS X we support (formerly Tiger, now Leopard and Snow Leopard). The advantage of this setup is that I don’t waste disk space for operation systems I usually don’t use very often. Currently I have a 150GB hard disk in my MacBook Pro which is really not that much if you deal in the virtualization business. There are several test VM’s of any kind of guest operation systems and of course the ISO’s to install them. The second main OS, I do much of my work, is Linux. For this I have a standard PC with Gentoo on it, which have all that I need. Unfortunately this doesn’t really help when I on travel. As I soon be away for some time, I decided I need, at least for testing, the same flexibility mentioned above for a Linux installation. And here the problems start to arise. Of course Apple didn’t really support installing other OS’s than Mac OS X on Apple hardware. Yes, there is Boot Camp, but this is mainly for Windows, is very inflexible and doesn’t really help if you try to install something on another place than the integrated hard disk. There are projects like rEFIt, which even makes Boot Camp superfluous, but this project has really bad USB boot support. In the following I will explain how it is even possible to install Ubuntu 9.10 on a USB hard disk.

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