Tag Archives: Gentoo

Using suppression files with Valgrind

Valgrind is one of the great tools in the long list of freely available applications for development. Beside several profiling tools it also contains a memory checker. Leaking memory is one of the more common errors a programmer could step into. Basically it means to forget freeing memory (or in a more general sense: any resource) a program has acquired. If you are a perfect developer, this will never happen to you. If you are a good developer it may happen and that’s where Valgrind will save you some trouble. As most of the developers out there are more or less good developers, their programs produce memory leaks, too ;). The right solution for this, is of course to write a bug report. But there are times where this isn’t possible or you are in hurry and don’t want to see all the errors of a third-party library you link against.

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Installing Linux on a USB hard disk for the MacBook Pro

One of the features of Mac OS X I love, is the possibility to install Mac OS X on any attached removable media, like a FireWire or USB hard disk. This makes it really easy for me to test VirtualBox on the several versions of Mac OS X we support (formerly Tiger, now Leopard and Snow Leopard). The advantage of this setup is that I don’t waste disk space for operation systems I usually don’t use very often. Currently I have a 150GB hard disk in my MacBook Pro which is really not that much if you deal in the virtualization business. There are several test VM’s of any kind of guest operation systems and of course the ISO’s to install them. The second main OS, I do much of my work, is Linux. For this I have a standard PC with Gentoo on it, which have all that I need. Unfortunately this doesn’t really help when I on travel. As I soon be away for some time, I decided I need, at least for testing, the same flexibility mentioned above for a Linux installation. And here the problems start to arise. Of course Apple didn’t really support installing other OS’s than Mac OS X on Apple hardware. Yes, there is Boot Camp, but this is mainly for Windows, is very inflexible and doesn’t really help if you try to install something on another place than the integrated hard disk. There are projects like rEFIt, which even makes Boot Camp superfluous, but this project has really bad USB boot support. In the following I will explain how it is even possible to install Ubuntu 9.10 on a USB hard disk.

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FRITZ!Box tuning part 2: Access your home network with OpenVPN

AVM has built a VPN server into the FRITZ!Box, why should I use some other software for this job, you may ask. The reason is quite simple: the build in one is a piece of closed source software written by AVM and there is only one official client which could be used to connect to it, the FRITZ!VPN software. This client software is only available for the Windows operation system family and so by no means anything useful to me. I’m pretty sure they are using some official protocol like IPSec, so it might be possible to connect to the FRITZ!Box with other clients as well, but that’s something I didn’t want to try. OpenVPN on the other side is a rock solid open source software which could be used from many popular OS’s these days. Even graphical clients, like TunnelBlick for Mac OS X, are available. So here comes the second article of the FRITZ!Box tuning series, which will explain how to convert your FRITZ!Box into a OpenVPN server, where any number of clients can concurrently be connected. I highly recommend to read the first part of this series, because this post is build on top of the stuff done there. This count especially for the filesystem layout on the usbstick and the way additional software is started. Also in the following it will be helpful to have ssh access to the FRITZ!Box all the time. As already written in the first part, there is no guarantee that the information presented here will work on your side or that I’m responsible for anything happen to your FRITZ!Box. In preparation of the following you need access to a second OpenVPN installation which will be used to create all necessary certificates and keys and which could be used to test the installation afterward. I’m using a Gentoo Linux host where you could install OpenVPN simply by executing emerge openvpn. Make sure you have the examples USE flag set to get all the helper scripts which make the life much more easier.

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