Tag Archives: boot

FRITZ!Box tuning part 4: Cross-building and installing additional applications

The articles I wrote about the FRITZ!Box are pretty popular. They are creating the most traffic on my website. I understand this, cause the FRITZ!Box is a really great piece of hardware and AVM is also a company which knows how to make their users happy by serving regular updates to the firmware. Although I didn’t tuned my FRITZ!Box any further, I updated it with the latest Labor firmware version regularly. At some point the sshd setupĀ (with dropbear) doesn’t worked anymore and I decided it is the time to update my software as well. Beside that it didn’t work anymore it is always a good idea to update software which allow access to a host from everywhere very regularly. Anyway, it turned out this isn’t as simple as I initial thought. Therefore here is the next post in the FRITZ!Box tuning series, which shows how to cross-build software for the MIPS32 architecture used in the FRITZ!Box and in particular get the sshd software to life again. I use a FRITZ!Box Fon WLAN 7270 v2 and the firmware is 54.05.05. Please make sure you read the other FRITZ!Box articles as well, cause some of the information given there still applies.

Read more...

Installing Linux on a USB hard disk for the MacBook Pro

One of the features of Mac OS X I love, is the possibility to install Mac OS X on any attached removable media, like a FireWire or USB hard disk. This makes it really easy for me to test VirtualBox on the several versions of Mac OS X we support (formerly Tiger, now Leopard and Snow Leopard). The advantage of this setup is that I don’t waste disk space for operation systems I usually don’t use very often. Currently I have a 150GB hard disk in my MacBook Pro which is really not that much if you deal in the virtualization business. There are several test VM’s of any kind of guest operation systems and of course the ISO’s to install them. The second main OS, I do much of my work, is Linux. For this I have a standard PC with Gentoo on it, which have all that I need. Unfortunately this doesn’t really help when I on travel. As I soon be away for some time, I decided I need, at least for testing, the same flexibility mentioned above for a Linux installation. And here the problems start to arise. Of course Apple didn’t really support installing other OS’s than Mac OS X on Apple hardware. Yes, there is Boot Camp, but this is mainly for Windows, is very inflexible and doesn’t really help if you try to install something on another place than the integrated hard disk. There are projects like rEFIt, which even makes Boot Camp superfluous, but this project has really bad USB boot support. In the following I will explain how it is even possible to install Ubuntu 9.10 on a USB hard disk.

Read more...